Simple leader vs boss photo that can actually mean a lot.

Have you ever had a boss that you don’t like? Or known someone who always complained about their boss? Well lucky for me in my experience of a little over a year now in the workplace the only leaders I’ve had we’re really great ones. However, I’ve definitely heard stories from friends and families about bosses at work who act more like bullies rather than leaders. But what types of bosses make good leaders?

Well, according to mindtool.com an effective leader is someone who creates a vision of the future, motivates and inspires people to engage with that vision while also coaching a team so that it is more effective at achieving the vision. To me, a good leader is someone who can demonstrate to a team an effective plan while also helping and guiding them along the way, also while being a genuinely nice person about it. The manager / leader I’d like to have is someone who can motivate and inspire me to perform my absolute best on any certain task. And again, being a nice person who can talk about or address any sort of problem is a huge part of working in any role in a team.

What type of boss did you have?

On many sites talking about leadership styles, such as smallbusiness.chrom.com, they talk about roughly 5 different types of leadership styles. One of them is called Laissez-Faire (Rough translation from French is ‘let do’) where a leader does not provide direct supervision to their employees as they are already highly trained or experienced. This style gives the power of decision making to the workers as a sort of a ‘self-rule’. The leader is only there to provide guidance whenever requested. Another is Autocratic leadership style has managers have total authority over a team by being able to make decisions alone without any other inputs from the team. (Insert Trump joke here) This style of leadership may benefit some employees who require close supervision however this would severely aggravate any creative employees of the team, including myself. One more style is called Participative leadership, this style of leader values input of team members but has the sole responsibility of making final decisions. This style allows employees to make contributions to the decision-making process, and I think is one of the better styles to use for businesses.

What do I think makes a good leader?

Now, I’m unsure if I’d be a good fit for a business leader but if I were one I’d try to be as transparent and inspiring as I can. I think transparency is needed as a leader so the employees understand what goal the team is trying accomplish, and I think all leaders should be inspiring to promote passion among the employees. A good leader must be confident in their team’s abilities as well as being decisive in case the team encounters a fork-in-the-road problem. I feel that employees thoughts are as important as the leader’s too so the manager of a team must be open-minded and have good communication skills. Most importantly though, a leader must be focused on the plans and goals of the entire team.

2 thoughts on “Leadership – Different types of leaders and my opinions.”

It’s interesting to think about the 3 types of leadership, and when the strengths of each come into play during the bootstrapping phase of your startup. The leap from a partnership of 2 founders to the first formal hierarchy with hiring employee #1 can be jarring for those not accustom to a leadership role.

So much momentum can depend on keeping the team motivated as you work towards the MVP launch. For a founder, how do you know when to “tighten the reigns” versus letting employees go “wide open throttle”? It can have a major impact not only on meeting milestones, but also meeting expectations of strong and inspiring leadership.

Thanks for the post Spencer.

Eric Lortie Eric Lortie says:

I like that you’re aiming for transparent & inspiring. I agree that they’re both great traits to see in a leader. It’s worth noting that they’re also among the most difficult.

Sometimes transparency isn’t possible. In those scenarios trust is key. You can build that trust by being transparent when it’s possible and it’ll often carry you through the other times, provided the ratio is still favourable.

Inspiring people can be a really fun challenge. What’s inspirational can be very subjective. The key there is knowing your team members, always a worthwhile effort, and getting their trust.

Trust is actually a major factor in both things you’ve discussed… but you haven’t typed the word in your blog post. I find that really interesting. We’ve spent the better part of a year together. You’re a trusting guy, and that’s really commendable. There is an honesty to how you approach things that will serve you well in life. I’m absolutely confident you’ll make a better leader than you realize.


Leave a Reply